Living Social Justice

A blog about responding to poverty and injustice, everyday and in all sorts of ways

Archive for the tag “R10 a day”

Beyond The Hunger Pangs

During the Live Under The Line challenge, the Common Ground Church base was buzzing with conversation as staff members traded recipes and shared their experiences. But what about a month later? Here are some post-LUTL staff reflections…

I’m trying to be more generous

156098_10151343760646281_797515950_n-001“After doing LUTL, I’m more aware of how I spend money on a daily basis. It’s incredible how all the little things we buy here and there add up and are often unnecessary luxuries—luxuries that most living in poverty cannot afford to have. I’ve tried to cut back on unnecessary spending and also limit my electricity usage to have more on hand for blessing others. During LUTL, I became quite grumpy and moody when I didn’t have enough to eat for the day. Now when I see someone begging who is quite aggressive or desperate, I understands that it might be just because they haven’t had enough to eat. It’s given me a greater heart of compassion and grace for people living in challenging situations.” – Lindsay Sherring, Common Good fundraising coordinator

I’m thinking, what else?

73017_457583527711_6000657_n-001“This year was my second time doing LUTL, and whilst the first time was about initial exposure and counting the rands and cents, this time was more about the unbelievable reality that 13 million South Africans live on R10 a day for ALL things. It made me realise how easy it is for me to pay R40 or R50 for a simple lunch – when that represents the entire amount one person living below the breadline has to live on for five days. The hard part is the next step. Contracting budgets is one response – but what else? It will be different for everyone, but there must be some kind of response.  But guilt cannot be the driving factor, otherwise our motives will be misplaced. It must start with seeing others the way God does – made in His image, and therefore deserving of dignity.” – Tim Hoffman, Common Good mobilise and equip programme manager

I have more compassion

901939_611366308891932_516021097_o-001“Around the office we chatted that it was almost impossible to live on R10 a day and remain healthy, both mentally and physically. I’m far more aware of people who are living on the street and I have more compassion for them and their situation. Now I take the time to talk to them, to be friendly and engage them in a conversation, rather than just giving them a nod or smile or ignoring them completely. I have tremendous respect for those who struggle on a daily basis to cope with life without adequate resources. I am truly blessed to have what I have and be in the situation I am, but I am also aware that anyone can end up in a desperate situation and that it is often not of their own making but because of life circumstances beyond their control.” – Moira Richards, Common Ground Church hospitality and redemption group coordinator

What about you? Has the Live Under The Line challenge impacted you in anyway?

P.S. Other great post-LUTL reads: “13 Million Reasons To Do Social Justice” and “Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow”

13 Million Reasons To Do Social Justice

Did Live Under The Line challenge or change the way you live in anyway? Eulogi Rheeder shares how living on R10 a day opened her eyes to the individuals behind the statistics.

A snapshot of Eulogi's groceries for the three day challenge

A snapshot of Eulogi’s groceries for the three day challenge

I’ve done Live Under The Line (LUTL) every year, but my hunger pangs always got the better of me and I usually gave up before the end of day one. This year, however, I was determined to complete the challenge or, at the very least, make it to the end of day two.

As I set out on the first day of the LUTL challenge, 9 September 2013, I asked God to freshly stir my heart for social justice in our City. Instead, He opened my eyes and gave me 13 million reasons to take Live Under The Line beyond the three days. Here’s my story…

Last year, my small group visited The Haven Night Shelter in Woodstock; our aim was to spend time and bless those who are vulnerable, in need and away from their loved ones. On the first night I met Diane*. She had come to South Africa from Malawi in the hope of creating a better life here. Instead, she found herself homeless, unemployed and at the mercy of others. I was touched by her story of bravery and her love for Christ, and how she didn’t allow her circumstances to dictate her zest for life.

My small group continued to visit the shelter every couple months and my friendship with Diane grew; she also started coming with us to Common Ground Innercity.

But soon enough ‘normal’ life – work, family, friends, church and other responsibilities – took over. And my friendship with Diane became secondary to the ‘more important’ stuff in my life. I would see her at church on Sundays and SMS her every other week, but my contact with her had become a social justice act without Jesus at the heart. In short, it was nothing more than just another task.

Fast forward to Wednesday, 11 September 2013, the final day of Live Under The Line. I had made it and was just a few hours away from finishing the challenge. Many of us were talking about what we would eat once we are allowed to break the R10 a day bank: Big Macs, a Vida cappuccino, a bacon croissant, Speckled Eggs… the list went on and on. As I was excitedly thinking about what I was most looking forward to eating again, Diane’s face popped up in my mind.

Although my heart had made the connection that Live Under the Line was recognising and identifying with how 13 million South African’s live every day, my eyes were starting to see the faces, stories, hopes and hurt behind the statistic – it was people like Diane.

Suddenly LUTL was no longer about the food, the money and the hard-hitting stat, but about the people; the 13 million individuals. This thought challenged me to think, how was I going to take LUTL with me into the rest of the year? How was I going to live social justice with the heart of Jesus for the other 362 days?

In John 13:34, Jesus instructs us to love one another just as He loved us. When I read this scripture on the afternoon of 11 September, I knew that this is how I (and you) can take Live Under The Line with me (us) every day: if I truly loved Diane, like Jesus loved me, she would be my friend; we’d have a real relationship; and Diane wouldn’t be just another tick on my social justice to-do list.

So, in the month since LUTL, I’ve freshly approached my friendship with Diane, based on John 13:34. We visit each other at our homes, we’ve gone for picnics and braais, and we encourage each other with scriptures. She’s told me about growing up in Malawi and I’ve shared stories from my teen years. I’m now purposefully spending time with her; not because I feel this is what I need to do, but because I’ve gotten to know Diane, and truly love her and call her my friend.

Diane and I come from very different backgrounds and very different circumstances, yet we meet each other in the middle because we love each other like Jesus loves us.

LUTL has not only allowed me to look at social justice with fresh eyes, but also challenged me that it’s not about what I do for social justice, but about how I do it.

So, how are you doing social justice?

*Name has been changed

– Eulogi is the communications manager at Common Good and a member of the Common Ground Church InnerCity congregation.

P.S. Some more LUTL feedback and reflections: “Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow” and “Have You Heard Of LUTLing?

Have you heard of lutling?

Probably not, but if you’re intrigued, read on. Christine Martin van Wyk explains her experience of ‘lutling’ and why she and her husband are going to do it again.

Christine and her husband Simon took part in the three-day Live Under The Line challenge

Christine and her husband Simon took part in the three-day Live Under The Line challenge

lutl·ing [lah-ti-ling]

verb 1. the act of a person or thing that eats food to the value of ZAR10 or less per day with the express purpose of identifying with the 13 million people in South Africa who live below the poverty line. Usage: “Would you like a granola bar?” “A granola bar is R7.50 and I’m lutling. That’s three quarters of my daily allowance.’’

Did you ‘lutl’ last week?

Congratulations are not necessarily in order, for the simple reason that living under the line for three days is not really a triumph. I spent a large proportion of my three days dreaming about my meal at midnight on Wednesday. My hunger pangs mingled with the uncomfortable reality that the 13 million people who live under the line every day of the year, and who I was trying to empathize with, didn’t have that meal to look forward to.

A self-confessed foodie, I am far from bashful in declaring that food brings me a lot of joy. I love everything about it. I love buying food, I love baking wedding cakes. I love putting a meal down on the table and I especially love watching people bond over food. I spend the better part of Sunday planning a weekly menu for my husband and I. Ask my friends, ask my family. Ask my Weigh-less coach. I love food.

To give you a good idea of our Live Under The Line (LUTL) experience, I’m going to be interspersing this post with Tweets  from by husband’s Twitter account during the challenge. Here’s the first one:

“Tonight I ate an ungodly amount of pasta to try make up for the next 3 days. It’s all the fun of carbo loading but without the race. #lutl” ‏@simonstreep

The usual preparation went into lutling this year (third year running): the tears, the denial, the bargaining. The soya mince. And yet God had new things for me to learn.

Small things:

Packets are an unnecessary expense. As my husband and I clocked in an early shop at Checkers, with calculator in hand, we forgot to factor in the price of a plastic shopping bag, never mind the eco-friendly brown paper ones I usually use. We carried our instant noodles, tomatoes and bread in our arms. That was a first.

“Wife and I heading to Checkers for our #lutl shopping. Holding thumbs for some unrealistic specials. Whole chicken for R2.99? Can only hope.” ‏@simonstreep

When you have little, it means a lot. As we packed our boot with the groceries, I worried about the eggs. I mean, I usually give them a second thought, but never before have I actually been concerned for their well-being. But when those six medium non-free range eggs represent three breakfasts for two people, I worried.

Carelessness is a luxury. I cooked some butternut soup in advance and I left it out over night, because the pot was hot. It wasn’t ready for the fridge, and I often do this. But this time of all times, the milk I added (for the creaminess that is normally provided by my unaffordable yogurt) must have soured. My final LUTL dinner was a slice of bread with margarine and some sweet potatoes that a friend spared for me.

“Wife just phoned to say our butternut soup has fermented. But I had already finished a bowl. #fail #supper #lutl” ‏@simonstreep

My husband really does need me. That is all.

“I might need lessons in frying eggs again… #eggfail #breakfast #lutl” ‏@simonstreep

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“I spoke too soon. Tomorrow, my wife shall be on frying duty… #breakfast #fail #lutl” @simonstreep

BTx8WoXIAAAIuhs

“My wife fried my egg this morning, hence why it actually ended up resembling an egg. #breakfast #win #lutl” ‏@simonstreep

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Big things:

Assuming others needs is dangerous. On Mondays, our church meets to pray. In light of LUTL, we had a few representatives from some of our Common Good partner organisations share with us the ways we could partner with them in prayer. I was struck by the common thread in their requests. They need people. They asked us to pray for people – for more volunteers to join their ranks and for existing volunteers who are working under challenging circumstances. An example, they asked us to pray for the teachers at a school where funding for a feeding programme has been lost. These teachers now have to choose seven children from their class of 45 who will receive a meal.

This really struck me.

My assumption has always been that organisations are under-funded, and while they certainly are, the request was for people to join their ranks. People are needed, our TIME is needed.

Moreover, giving financially to these organisations doesn’t exempt us from giving our time to them. Nor does giving our time let us off the hook of giving of our finances to organisations that are in need.

Being in need makes us vulnerable. Vulnerable to cold weather. Vulnerable to sin. It’s easy to be ungracious, impatient and downright grumpy when we’re hungry, when we’ve shared our slice of bread with a ‘starving’ spouse. It doesn’t excuse us for rudeness, or excuse genuine malice, but it explains and contextualizes the genuine struggle that a quarter of our country experiences.

When we see faces that look genuinely surly or disgruntled, we can be aware that it may be rooted in genuine vulnerability. Not hunger. Not a headache that cannot be medicated. Vulnerability. And our grace goes a long way for these faces and people.

God gives us more (grace). James 4:6. We are not above new lessons from our Heavenly Father. Having lived under the line twice before, I wondered what I would have to write about. Now I’m struggling to keep quiet. Just as a piece of scripture on different days will speak to us in varied ways, the same experience can yield brand new fruit. Fresh grace and tears for those who experience this struggle everyday of every month.

I’ll be lutling next year. Prepare yourself in advance, @simonstreep.

– Christine is the coordinator for the Common Ground Rondebosch AM congregation and embarked on the LUTL challenge with her husband, musician and writer, Simon van Wyk, who provided a running commentary of the LUTL challenge via his Twitter account.

So how did you find lutling this year?

“Very tough and extremely humbling”

Here’s what three Common Grounders had to say after living on R10 a day for food for three days as part of the Live Under The Line challenge…

23384_10151376398550219_1919569962_n“Sitting and watching others eat amazing dishes was absolute torture, but it did make me realise how many people living so close to me are going to bed hungry – how many children in our city are going without dinner and how many parents are going without food to make sure that their children have at least something in their tummies. It can be so overwhelming to think about all the hardship around us, but I’ve learned that even the smallest input, whether it’s my time, money, resources or prayers, can help to make a difference. This challenge is one that will continue to change and shape the way I view my life and the lives of others. It was hard but I would sign up right now to do it again next year because I believe it’s a lesson that we should be teaching ourselves over and over again.” – Jocelyn Bartosch

943304_10152978569880720_1950582601_n“This year was the first time I attempted to Live Under The Line and to be honest I found it very tough and extremely humbling. I work in the construction industry and saw that what I ate over the last few days was pretty much the norm for many of my colleagues who are manual labourers. This hit home hard as I do no manual labour and I was struggling from the lack of nourishment. I had no energy, I was hungry and I had a headache. My colleagues who do manual labour all day never complain about feeling tired or hungry or having a headache. What was even more humbling was the fact that at any time I could just simply throw in the towel, walk across the street and buy myself something to eat and drink. This however is not an option for my colleagues or for 13 000 000 South Africans.This challenge has made me realise exactly how much God has blessed me and has challenged me to get more involved with social upliftment programmes.” – Brad van der Westhuizen

17101_10152169117095212_1164264679_n“The LUTL challenge has had a huge impact on my life. It’s helped me understand what the majority of our country goes through on a daily basis and the kinds of struggles they experience. Suddenly, when you are trying to work out the problem of how best to spend the little money you have, the smaller, selfish, insignificant struggles fall away showing you what’s really important. Instead of thinking with your mind about an issue, you get to feel it with your tummy. It’s amazing how that can affect one’s decisions. It’s definitely changed my outlook on poverty and it’s made it more real for me as opposed to it just being an issue we have to put up with.” – Samantha Tobias

What was your experience of LUTL like?

P.S. Other great LUTL reads: “My Live Under The Line Diary” by Phil Olckers and “What It Felt Like To Be Homeless” by Richard Bolland

My Live Under The Line Diary

The final day of the Live Under The Line challenge is drawing to a close, but as many of us contemplate our first ‘above the line’ meal in days, Phil Olckers reflects on his three-day experience.

"It just hit me how blessed I really am"

“It just hit me how blessed I really am”

So Monday morning started a little crazy for me. The Live Under The Line challenge kind of slipped my mind a little bit over the weekend, and after church on Sunday evening it was too late, and I was too lazy, to go and do my grocery shopping. I woke up Monday pretty hungry, about to smash a bowl of Pronutro and coffee as I often do on a Monday morning, but then I remembered I was supposed to be “Living Under The Line,” so a glass of water had to do the trick. (Thank God for clean running tap water!) And off I went to start the day.

I had a really busy morning at work so only got around to go shopping at about 10:30ish. By then I was starving and very tempted to call it all off. But the fact that I had committed to speaking in front of church kept me going. I can’t lie, that was the only reason. So after quite a few calculations, I managed to work out a perfectly good LUTL diet for the next three days.

I carefully picked three decent-sized bananas. Usually I’d just go for the best looking ones, but now I had to try keep this cheap, so had to take size into consideration here. Then a loaf of un-sliced freshly baked bread. It was  the cheapest option, but  turned out to be the best (the bread is AMAZING!) A jar of peanut butter, which luckily for me was on promotion, so I scored R3 leftover, and oats for breakfast. My menu then became oats for breakfast, peanut butter and bread for lunch and dinner, and a banana as a snack.

Day 1

I struggled. My body was a bit man down from a general flu-ish feeling. But I had committed so I didn’t give in. I did a 12km run after work – I really enjoy training and staying fit – but I was seriously craving a full meal afterwards with a proper portion of meat. But two slices of bread had to do the trick and off I went to a farewell where everyone was eating food and drinking beer – I had my water. Live Under The Line was a great conversation starter and got a lot of people thinking and inspired, so I’m glad I stuck out day one.

Day 2

My mind was now in the game. I was so ready for day two. I mean it’s actually a lot to eat considering people who really live under the line. Got to work and when I reached over to get my packet of lunch for the day, the horror hit. I forgot it at home. Noooo. Luckily, I had spare oats at work and the R3 I saved thanks to the peanut butter promotion, so a R3 delicious roll from Spar served me for lunch.

Was still feeling flu-ish though, so I bought some Corenza-C and a Lucozade. I debated for a while whether I could buy these, but the whole point of LUTL for me is the change it brings to my heart, and so I decided to take the “stay healthy” route. This challenge made me realise how expensive even just your basic everyday medicine is – in one day I blew five days worth of budget for about three days worth of medicine. to treat a common cold.

Did another run, so I really needed that Lucozade energy. This made me realise that I wouldn’t be able to keep up my training program if I was living on R10 a day. Even after just two days I could feel my energy decreased significantly.

Day 3

It’s my birthday today so saying no to cake is going to be difficult. I bought a cake for all my colleagues at work, so I get to watch them enjoy it – not looking forward to that! But, hey, hopefully it opens up some more awesome conversations.

Went swimming at 6am, and after that my girlfriend gave me my birthday present and wanted to surprise me with a smoothie. I then remembered I was LUTL’ing… But… I can’t lie, I cheated, I let her buy me one. It’s my birthday – I’m allowed a treat, right? Besides, my R10 diet isn’t really helping me stay energised with my training program, so I really needed it this morning. I will do my best to stick to it for the rest of the day, but the temptation to quit and enjoy birthday treats is really getting to me.

Final thoughts

This year, LUTL has been a good one for my heart. The first time I did it in 2011 I was really excited and on such a buzz afterwards, phoning Common Good peeps and wanting to give, give, give. But that disappeared after a month. During last year’s LUTL challenge I just wanted to get it over and done with. I got a little bit annoyed with it and it didn’t really do much for me. But this year, LUTL really got me thinking.

I walked past a beggar yesterday. I had a wallet full of money and could have easily given him some food, but I just though about my own stomach and shrugged him off. I’m not changing over night, but this year the challenge is really causing me to ask God to help change the way I view all the things I have and earn in this life. I’m also asking God to reveal to me how I can give more effectively and allow him into that part of my life.

For now I’m just grateful for all that I have, but I’m really praying for God to help me become more gracious and joyful with my giving. It’s a slow process but at least the praying for that has started now.

– Phil is a Sound Engineer. He works at a film company in Cape Town doing Sound Design and Final Mixing for feature films. He is part of the Common Ground Constantiaberg PM community.

P.S. Other great LUTL reads: “What It Felt Like To Be Homeless” by Richard Bolland, and “Why My Family Is Going Hungry” by Julie Williams

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