Living Social Justice

A blog about responding to poverty and injustice, everyday and in all sorts of ways

How Do You Celebrate Christmas?

The tinsel and trees are up and carols are ringing through shopping centres. With Christmas just a few weeks away, we asked a few Common Grounders to share what the day means to them and how they celebrate it.  

PeliswaIn New Cross Roads, Cape Town

“Christmas is for family – it’s a family gathering. Some of us live in different places so it’s when we can spend time together. Christmas is when we bond. In my family, we all meet – aunties, cousins – at my mom’s place. Early in the morning we sit around and drink coffee together then we open presents. Each person’s buys a present for one person. Cheap stuff – not expensive things. In my point of view, Christmas is a time for giving. Even if we don’t have a lot, we all eat together and spend time together. It’s a special day.” Pheliswa

423209_751980315312_367089462_nIn Stuttgart, Germany

“We have a big Christmas Eve celebration. We usually go to church at  3pm and then the whole family – about 10 to 15 of us – gathers afterwards. My parents or one of my siblings will decorate the room so that no one sees the Christmas tree before dinner. Germany isn’t very family orientated so we invite people who don’t have anywhere to go for Christmas. The kids get to open one gift and then we read the Christmas story from the Bible. My dad usually says something really meaningful and then we pray and eat together.” Sarah

TerenceIn Grassy Park, Cape Town

“Growing up Christmas was always an exciting time because you’d get the one thing you wanted and we’d hang lights outside the house. I could never sleep the night before. But then Christmas was just about Father Christmas; now I understand that Christmas is the day that Jesus was born and that is the main reason why we should celebrate. I’m more aware of those who don’t have. I always try to give them something if I can afford it so that at least they have something. I do feel a little bit sad at Christmas time because it reminds me of my mom who passed away, but thankfully I have my sister, so she makes up for it.”  Terence

FreddyIn Kinshasa, Congo

“Where I’m from in the Congo, my parents are elders in their extended family so Christmas is a huge event. We normally invite all our uncles, aunts, and cousins. For the elders, they kill a chicken and they have traditional food, but for the kids we have French fries! We spend the whole day together until late. My dad, as the eldest, reads a story about Jesus from the Bible. He encourages those who’ve been through difficult times during the year to remain strong because Jesus came for our salvation. From 10pm to 3am, those who are Christian, have overnight prayer at church. During that prayer meeting, it’s not about preaching – it’s about praising God and dancing. It’s a very joyful event.” Freddie

156098_10151343760646281_797515950_n-001In St Louis, America 

“In America, Christmas is all about family traditions. In my family, we start the morning off by reading the Christmas story from the book of Luke with the sounds of our favourite old school Stephen Curtis Chapman Christmas album wafting through the air (it generally plays five times on repeat).  We then open gifts one at a time starting with the oldest and break halfway through for my mom’s famous egg casserole, homemade cranberry coffee cake and chocolate Lindt balls. The rest of the day is spent with extended family where the dads try to relive their childhood by putting together the little boys’ legos.” Lindsay

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Show loveChristmas isn’t a festive season for everyone. But you can make this year different by showing love to and making a real difference in the lives of those who are vulnerable and in need. For more information on our ‘Show Love This Christmas’ campaign and how you can get involved, click here.

 

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